College of Arts & Sciences

Open All Tabs
  • BIL101 Introduction to Biological Sciences

    This is an introductory biology course for non-science majors, covering some most basic
    concepts in life science. As you explore the many facets of biology and its relevance to life in the
    modern world, you will see two unifying themes recurring throughout this on line course.
    Hierarchical organization - life is organized on many levels within individual organisms
    including atoms, cells, tissues, and organs. And in the larger world, organisms themselves are
    organized into many levels: populations, communities, and ecosystems within the biosphere. The
    power of evolution - Evolution, the change in genetic characteristics of individuals within
    populations over time, accounts for the diversity of organisms, but also explains the unity among
    them.

  • CHM110 Chemical Problem Solving

    Chemical problem solving strategies to prepare students for more advanced studies in the sciences. Focusing on basic concepts in chemistry, chemical problem solving, and mathematical preparation for future studies.

  • CHM121 Chemistry for the Biosciences I

    This is the first course in a three course sequence designed to meet the needs of Life Science students interested in pursuing professional education in the health sciences. Topics to be covered in this course include: basic atomic structure, reaction stoichiometry, gases, chemical equilibrium, acids and bases, thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. Co-registration with a separate recitation section is required.

  • CHM221 Chemistry for the Biosciences II

    This is the second course in a three course sequence designed to meet the needs of Life Science students interested in pursuing professional education in the health sciences. Topics to be covered in this course include: electronic atomic structure, basic quantum mechanics, molecular geometry, identification of organic molecules, and interpretation of chemical structures via spectroscopic methods. Co-registration with a separate recitation section is required.

  • CHM222 Chemistry for the Biosciences III

    This is the third course in a three course sequence designed to meet the needs of Life Science students interested in pursuing professional education in the health sciences. Topics to be covered in this course include: organic chemical reactivity, reaction prediction analysis, organic reaction mechanisms, electronic interactions, energy states, and reactivity of biomolecules. Co-registration with a separate recitation section is required.

  • CLA210 Greek and Latin Roots of English

    Equips students with the tools needed to analyze and understand the meanings of English words with Ancient Greek and Latin roots. Special attention will be paid to legal and medical terminology.

  • ENG105 English Composition I

    Introduction to written academic argument and inquiry. Not for major or minor. Cannot be taken on credit-only option.
    Requisite: ACT English score 18-31; or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing or Critical Reading score 430-690; or TOEFL iBT Writing score 18 or above.

  • ENG106 English Composition II

    Advanced approaches to written academic argument, with emphasis on textual analysis and incorporation of secondary sources. Not for major or minor. Cannot be taken on credit-only option.
    Requisite: ENG 105 OR ACT English score 32 or above; or SAT Evidence-Based Reading and Writing or Critical Reading score 700 or above or Foote Fellow designation.

  • ENG230 Advanced Professional Communication

    Professional writing with critical attention to complex rhetorical situations. Practice in formal and informal written communication styles.

  • INS202 INS Methodology

    The approaches, methods and techniques used for designing and conducting international studies research.

  • INS321 International Development

    A synthesis of major theories of international development, institutional architecture, and practice of international development. Focuses on key international development policies such as trade, macroeconomic finance, and equity. Considers narrow conceptions of modernity, growth, progress, wellbeing, and culture toward broader conceptions of freedom and/or sustainable development in both the Global North and Global South.

  • MTH101 Algebra for College Students

    Algebraic operations and properties of the real numbers; linear and quadratic equations and inequalities; polynomials and factoring; rational expressions; radical expressions; graphs of lines; systems of linear equations.
    Requisite: SAT Math Section Score >= 550 or Math ACT Score >= 22 or ALEKS score >= 40 or passing grade in MTH 099.

  • MTH107 Precalculus Mathematics

    Algebraic operations; equations and inequalities; complex numbers; functions and their graphs; polynomial, rational, exponential, and logarithmic functions; inverse functions; systems of non-linear equations.
    Requisite: SAT Math Section Score >= 600 OR Math ACT Score >= 25 OR ALEKS score >= 55 OR passing grade in MTH 101.

  • MTH108 Precalculus Mathematics II

    Trigonometric functions, identities and equations, applications involving vectors, systems of nonlinear equations and inequalities and analytic geometry.
    Requisite: SAT Math Section Score >= 650 OR Math ACT Score >= 28 OR ALEKS score >= 65 OR a passing grade in MTH 107.

  • PHI353 Philosophy of Film

    Philosophical questions concerning the ontology and aesthetics of film.

  • PHY101 College Physics

    Elementary mechanics, thermal phenomena, fluids, waves. Courses 101-102-106-108 provide a ten-credit 'physics with lab' sequence without calculus.

  • POL551/651 Colisted - Productivity in the Public and Non-Profit Sectors

    Definitions and measures of productivity. Evaluation of government programs, and methods of productivity improvement.

  • REL131 Religion in America

    The history of religion in the U.S. from the pre-colonial period to the present. Includes study of the religion of Native Americans, African Americans, Asian Americans, women, Protestants, Catholics, Jews, and cults.

  • SOC101 Introduction to Sociology

    The scientific study of society and several sociological concepts, including, but not limited to: social theory, social research, social economy, social interaction, social class, social construction, gender stratification, race and ethnicity, family, and deviance. This course will help students to examine the social world around them using the sociological imagination. Students will learn how to connect research to concepts, deepening their understanding of the social world and social phenomena and develop critical thinking skills.

  • SOC371 Criminology

    The concepts of crime and criminal law, reviews several theoretical approaches to studying crime and criminal behavior, and focuses on several types of crime. In particular, it includes such topics as definitions of crime, sources of crime statistics, correlates and causes of crime, terrorism, genocide, corporate crime, and cybercrime.
    Prerequisite: SOC 101.

  • SOC388 Black Ghetto in Urban Society

    The origin and development of the concept of "ghetto" and application of this concept to both past and contemporary-views of black life in America. Students are introduced to the historical and social significance of the black ghetto in the context of the larger body of literature on the ghetto phenomenon. Emphasis is placed on gaining an understanding and developing critical insight into issues and prospects for the resolution of issues related to black ghettoization.
    Prerequisite: SOC 101.

  • SOC389 Black Athlete in White America

    The impact of racism on sport in the United States with a specific focus on the Black athlete. Drawing upon the literature on race and sport in America, the course takes a historical view of the social context in which black athletes have competed and excelled in their craft against tremendous odds both inside and outside of sport competition.
    Prerequisite: SOC 101.